Archives For culture

As global climate, resource and economic issues continue to grow in complexity, I see a source of hope in what is otherwise viewed as a nuisance by many of my clients. The empowerment of networked individuals using social media has created unprecedented movements, like the 300 000+ person strong People’s Climate March in NYC this past September. Continue Reading…

Recently, the #Social Survival Manifesto was presented to the membership of the International Public Relations Association through its Thought Leadership series. In my view, this is the perfect audience for Manifesto Principles as Public Relations professionals could very well become the natural guides on corporate online etiquette in years to come IF they embrace this new medium and give it the same attention they have traditionally given to the mainstream press. Continue Reading…

As we get into a discussion of active listening and social media, I will try to avoid the well worn prescriptions around monitoring and speak to issues of perception and competitive advantage. Sure, monitoring what is being said about your company is important and you have probably been urged to set up a digital monitoring system, or have already done so. But listening, in the real sense of the word, implies understanding why people are talking about you and your industry and also being able to grasp why they might be right to feel the way they doContinue Reading…

As a fluent French speaker and reader, I often have the privilege of exploring thoughts on social media reputation and crisis management from France, Quebec, and other Gallic realms. This is a parallel universe where core concepts may be similar to those in the English speaking world but tone and emphasis can be wildly different. Those who geeked out on French philosophers, like Foucault and Baudrillard, will know what I’m talking about. No equivalent English authorship exists for the concepts these thinkers cooked up, as if certain great ideas sprang from the language itself. Continue Reading…

In an earlier post titled Psychopaths, Robots and Airheads, I critiqued the online ‘personalities’ of many big brand and institutional social media accounts. As these giants learn basic social skills online, their often dysfunctional personae constitute an amusing field of study. And yet, ‘personhood’ should be nothing new to corporations. In the nineteenth century, great legal battles were fought to gain them the same rights as individuals, including protection against defamation. Throughout the history of advertising, mascots and celebrity spokespeople were mobilized in efforts to make powerful economic conglomerates approachable, likeable and almost human. And now, these same giants want to be ‘friends’ with you on your favorite social networks. Continue Reading…