Archives For #SocialSM

So far, in this series of blog posts presenting principles for managing online reputation risk, I have laid out what I call the “Principles for Survival”, that is, the absolute essential practices for avoiding crisis. Starting with this post, we will move into the “Principles for Success”, precepts that, if adopted, can confer competitive advantages to the leaders who take them on. Principle #6, discussed below, is all about the surprising power of showing a little weakness online, especially if you are an all-powerful corporation or public institution.

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Summer is still with us for a short while and if you are taking your Kindle or Kobo with you on vacation, you can now download the #Social Survival Manifesto as an eBook on both platforms. Continue Reading…

Recently, the #Social Survival Manifesto was presented to the membership of the International Public Relations Association through its Thought Leadership series. In my view, this is the perfect audience for Manifesto Principles as Public Relations professionals could very well become the natural guides on corporate online etiquette in years to come IF they embrace this new medium and give it the same attention they have traditionally given to the mainstream press. Continue Reading…

As we get into a discussion of active listening and social media, I will try to avoid the well worn prescriptions around monitoring and speak to issues of perception and competitive advantage. Sure, monitoring what is being said about your company is important and you have probably been urged to set up a digital monitoring system, or have already done so. But listening, in the real sense of the word, implies understanding why people are talking about you and your industry and also being able to grasp why they might be right to feel the way they doContinue Reading…

In an earlier post titled Psychopaths, Robots and Airheads, I critiqued the online ‘personalities’ of many big brand and institutional social media accounts. As these giants learn basic social skills online, their often dysfunctional personae constitute an amusing field of study. And yet, ‘personhood’ should be nothing new to corporations. In the nineteenth century, great legal battles were fought to gain them the same rights as individuals, including protection against defamation. Throughout the history of advertising, mascots and celebrity spokespeople were mobilized in efforts to make powerful economic conglomerates approachable, likeable and almost human. And now, these same giants want to be ‘friends’ with you on your favorite social networks. Continue Reading…